News & Events

Events

  • TRANSATLANTIC TRADE & INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP petition

    Can we encourage as many as possible to sign and/or organise petitions - and if possible to attend the "Day of Action" at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Saturday 30th August at 10am.

    If the TTIP goes ahead, as is being discreetly negotiated at present, it will make billions for the US global corporations and ruin our society, economy and environment in the process.

     

     

    Read more ...  
  • The new Three Towns Food Network, linking Knighton, Presteigne and Kington to increase local food resilience, will be showing at Knighton Agricultural Show on 30 August (next to the tea tent, with Tene Valley Environmental Group and Knighton Tree Allotments Trust. Read more ...  

  • The 2014 Spring Greens Fair

     

    Bigger, better, bursting with good things green, but still intimate and charming...the 2014 Spring Greens Fair is back this weekend, 3/4 May at the wonderful Court of Noke, Staunton on Arrow. Mid Wales Permaculture Network will be there, of course (perennial forest garden plants for sale and adopt-a-plant with free plants for children. This year there will be even more wonderful food, activities, forum discussions, demonstrations, crafts, performace... see it all here:

    Read more ...  
  • FARMERS MARKET

    AND TRANSITION PRESTEIGNE SKILLSHARE

     

    SATURDAY 5TH APRIL

    Memorial Hall, Presteigne, 9am -1pm

     

    LOCAL PRODUCE inc fresh organic veg, local cheeses, meats, eggs, smokerie, scrummy bites, homemade Indian foods, apple juice ...

    A SPECIAL stall for April from Whitton WI

    Read more ...

Website status

This site has not been updated since 2014 and is being maintained as an archive for now. As time allows we'll be weeding out the dated material and presenting the many useful articles in a new format. We'd appreciate any feedback on what you find most useful on this site via our contact page.

A Pocket Full of Acorns

A Pocket Full Of Acorns is designed to encourage the planting of trees in designated areas for free. People are invited to gather native tree seeds and saplings, germinate seeds in carrier bags filled with moist soil, left out doors in the garden. Once germinated and grown to above 15cms the bunches of saplings are teased apart and planted directly into the soil. In Cockington Devon, we have a magnificent woodland, which in places is 25 feet tall. The woodland is rich with a wide range of native trees, has deer, badger and squirrels, but most of all the once barren field that was mostly rocks due to run off is now covered with rich fertile soil deposited over the years by deciduous leaf litter.

So there is no excuse for not doing anything to help restore our planet. 

If this approach is used to compliment Operation OASIS in arid coastal regions, anything becomes possible.

 

http://www.operationoasis.com/index.php?option=com_kunena&func=view&catid=16&id=26&Itemid=64

A Pocket Full of Acorns is part of the Operation Oasis initiative:

Operation OASIS makes use of the existing supply chain and does not need to burn fossil fuel to desalinate water, we already have an abundant supply of perfectly usable water pouring into the ocean every single day.

Shipping transports billions of cubic meters of water a year as ballast and then dumps it back into the ocean after "hopefully sterilizing it" The introduction of invasive marine species from discharged ballast has already wiped out entire fish stocks in areas where it is discharged.

Scientists are generally very good at talking the talk, but not very good at walking the walk.

Introducing fast growing trees rather than introducing a rich biodiversity of many tree species will leave their plantations wide open to forest fires. Eucalyptus is particularly volatile,

Waste water has already been shown to be much better for growing crops and trees than normal irrigation water, due to the nutrients available. If we add the biosolids left over from digestion to sandy soils we have transformed the sand grains into humus rich water retaining and fertile soils. Desert sand is soil with all of the organic matter eroded and leached away.

Andrew Fletcher

More information at:

http://www.operationoasis.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=28&Itemid=95

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